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Hills of East Sussex: Weald Books LLC

Hills of East Sussex: Weald

Books LLC

Published May 31st 2010
ISBN : 9781156259047
Paperback
44 pages
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 About the Book 

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Weald (pronounced ) is the name given to a physiographicMorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Weald (pronounced ) is the name given to a physiographic area in South East England situated between the parallel chalk escarpments of the North and the South Downs. It should be regarded as three separate parts: the sandstone High Weald in the centre- the clay Low Weald periphery- and the Greensand Ridge which stretches around the north and west of the Weald and includes the Wealds highest points. The Weald was once a vast forest covering this area. The name, Old English in origin, signifies woodland, which still applies today: scattered farms and villages betray the Wealds past, often in their names. The name Weald is derived from the Old English weald, meaning forest (cognate, German Wald). This comes from a Germanic root of the same meaning, and ultimately from Indo-European. Weald is a specifically a West Saxon form- wold is the Anglian form of the word. The Middle English form of the word is wld, and the modern spelling is a reintroduction of the Anglo-Saxon form attributed to its use by William Lambarde in his A Perambulation of Kent of 1576. In the Anglo-Saxon period the area had the name Andredes weald, meaning the forest of Andred, the latter derived from the Roman name of Pevensey, Anderida. The area is also referred to in Anglo-Saxon texts as Andredesleage, where the second element is another Old English word for woodland, represented by modern Leigh. The adjective for weald is wealden. Geology of south-eastern England. The High Weald is in lime green (9a)- the Low Weald, darker green (9). Chalk Downs, pale green (6) Geological section from north to south: High and Low Weald shown as oneThe Weald is the eroded remains of a geological structure, an anticline, a dome of layered Lower Cretaceous rocks cut through... More: https://booksllc.net/?id=261840